More about Temple

As one of the saddest points on the Hebrew calendar approaches - the 9th of Av - when we commemorate the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and subsequent exiling of the People of Gd, we will explore the intricate and ironically beautiful poetry of the Book of Lamentations (traditionally written for and read in order to commemorate the exile). In this study session we will review Chapter 3:1-20. You can access a few resources from BethImmanuel.org/kollel You can access a few resources in the following sites:

As one of the saddest points on the Hebrew calendar approaches - the 9th of Av - when we commemorate the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and subsequent exiling of the People of Gd, we will explore the intricate and ironically beautiful poetry of the Book of Lamentations (traditionally written for and read in order to commemorate the exile). In this study session we will review Chapter 2:13-22. You can access a few resources in the following sites:
 

As one of the saddest points on the Hebrew calendar approaches - the 9th of Av - when we commemorate the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and subsequent exiling of the People of Gd, we will explore the intricate and ironically beautiful poetry of the Book of Lamentations (traditionally written for and read in order to commemorate the exile). In this study session we will review Chapter 2:1-12. You can access a few resources in the following sites:
 

As one of the saddest points on the Hebrew calendar approaches - the 9th of Av - when we commemorate the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and subsequent exiling of the People of Gd, we will explore the intricate and ironically beautiful poetry of the Book of Lamentations (traditionally written for and read in order to commemorate the exile). You can access a few resources in the following sites:
 

As one of the saddest points on the Hebrew calendar approaches - the 9th of Av - when we commemorate the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and subsequent exiling of the People of Gd, we will explore the intricate and ironically beautiful poetry of the Book of Lamentations (traditionally written for and read in order to commemorate the exile). In this lesson we will review Chapter 1:1-5. You can access a few resources in the following sites:
 

As one of the saddest points on the Hebrew calendar approaches - the 9th of Av - when we commemorate the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and subsequent exiling of the People of Gd, we will explore the intricate and ironically beautiful poetry of the Book of Lamentations (traditionally written for and read in order to commemorate the exile). You can access a few resources in the following sites:
 

Where did the first Christians go to church? Our third teaching on the book of Hebrews takes a look at the Jewish believers and their relationship to the Temple and Levitical worship system in the first century and looks for the possible occasion that inspired the writing of the epistle. Learn about the sacred place of assembly where the Jerusalem community of disciples used to gather daily for prayer.

And they were all together in Solomon's Portico. (Act 5:12)

Bible teachers often use Hebrews 9 as proof that the disciples of Yeshua abandoned the Old Testament rituals of Temple worship and sacrifices as vestiges of an old covenant that had been replaced by a new covenant. A closer look reveals an entirely different message. Hebrews 9 uses the layout of the Temple to present  a mystical illustration of the passage from this world to the World to Come.

For more on sacrifices and the New Testament, see the First Fruits of Zion audio-teaching What About the New Covenant?.

Is the Temple on earth irrelevant since it is merely a shadow of the true heavenly reality?
This teaching on Hebrews 8:1-5 explains the Temple as a Shadow and a Copy of the supernal Temple above with references to Colossians 2:16-17 which describes the festivals and holy days as shadows of things that are to come--the substance of Messiah.

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