More about grace vs. law

Why does Paul refer to the Torah as "the law of sin and death"? What does it mean to say that we have "died to the law"? This teaching tackles some of the most difficult material in the Pauline epistles to try to make sense of Paul's theology regarind the Torah.

Download the attached PDF from the original 2014 class to follow along.

What does it mean to be "under the law"? Conventional teaching understands Paul's use of the terminology, "under the law," to mean legalism. This teaching from Romans 6 takes a completely different perspective.

Was Paul an apostate to Judaism and a traitor to the Jewish people? Reason Sixteen in the book Twenty-Six Reasons Jews Don't Believe in Jesus states that "Paul was the Source of Christian Opposition to the Jewish Law," but the allegations against Paul go much further, accusing him of being a Gentile, of being a closet Sadduccee and of collusion with Rome. This teaching challenges the pseudo-scholarship of popular anti-Paul writers.

Are "dead works" the "works of the Law"? Does the book of Hebrews tell us to repent from Torah observance when it speaks of "repentance from dead works."

What are the basic teachings of Messiah mentioned in Hebrews 6:1-3? Discover the meaning of repentance from dead works in this eighteenth installment of sermons on the epistle to the Hebrews.

I'm not perfect, just forgiven. I'm not holier than thou, I'm just a sinner saved by grace. Something has gone terribly wrong with our thinking if we believe that the only difference between a believer and a non-believer is that the believer is forgiven and assured of eternal life. That idea is not worthy of the name Christian or the name of Messiah, and it sullies the reputation of our holy Master. Hebrews 10:18-31 contains a stern warning and exhortation to the upward call of discipleship and the demands of new-covenant living.

Does the New Covenant really have better promises than the old? What are the better promises? How well do you really know the new covenant?

The book of Hebrews says that the Messiah has obtained a more excellent priesthood than the Aaronic priesthood because he is the mediator of a better covenant, which has been enacted on better promises (Hebrews 8:6). This discourse takes a closer look at the better promises of the new covenant as described in the prophecies of Jeremiah.

Does repentance mean to change your mind or to turn from sin? 

More thoughts on repentance from dead works as an essential part of the gospel and one of the elementary teachings of Yeshua. Evangelism is not like making toast. Discipleship and evangelism entail an ongoing process. This teaching includes excerpts from a blog in which an Evangelical pastor explains why he does not preach repentance.

The book of Hebrews warns us against allowing a bitter root to spring up in our lives, but the bitter root is probably not what you think it is. The Talmud says that one who says, "I will sin now and repent later, and sin again," is not forgiven. Take a look in the Torah to discover the real meaning of the bitter root. This teaching on Hebrews 12:11-29 challenges cheap grace while encouraging us to keep our eyes on the hope of the kingdom. 

In 2 Corinthians 3 Paul teaches a short discourse contrasting the glory of the Old Covenant and the glory of the New Covenant, employing the metaphor of the veil that concealed the light of Moses' face. This passage is frequently understood to imply replacement theology the cancellation of the Torah, but a closer look reveals a the role of the Torah in both old and new covenants.

What is the differences between the Letter of the Law and the Spirit of the Law in Pauline terminology? This teaching discusses the promise in Jeremiah 31 regarding the Torah written on our hearts in the New Covenant, with reference to Paul's discourse in Romans 7-8 regarding the Spirit and the Law. A foundational teaching for everyone interested in Messianic Judaism and the role of Torah in the lives of disciples of Yeshua.

Visit Our Messianic Synagogue

Beth Immanuel is a friendly and welcoming community. Click here to learn what to expect when you visit.

Join us as we enthrone the God of Israel with praise and uplift the name of Yeshua the Messiah!

Our Messianic Synagogue is located in historic Hudson, Wisconsin, just minutes away from St. Paul, Minnesota.

We always welcome visitors, but special events and holidays are wonderful times to visit.

Learn about Messianic Judaism

Download and listen to uplifting and insightful teachings presented by D. T. Lancaster and special guests.

Here are some Messianic Jewish books, music, and videos from the teachers at Beth Immanuel.

Read and study teachings and Bible studies from a Messianic Jewish perspective on a variety of topics.

Grow and learn daily through interactive video lessons from a variety of teachers.