Messianic Jewish Teachings

The Emperor's daughter said to Rabbi Yehoshua ben Chananiah: "What beautiful Torah in an ugly vessel." He replied, "Learn from the house of your father. In what is the wine stored?" "In jars of clay," she answered. "But all the common people store their wine in jars of clay! You use them too? You should keep your wine in jars of gold and silver!" 

The Torah commands that we observe a certain holiday on the first day of the seventh month. Scripturally, it is given two similar names: yom teru'ah (Day of Blasting/Shouting) in Numbers 29:1 and zichron teru'ah (Remembrance of Blasting/Shouting) in Leviticus 23:24. Jewish tradition refers to this day as Rosh HaShanah, which means "Beginning (lit., 'head') of the Year." But how can the beginning of the year occur in the seventh month? Didn't God command that the new year is to begin in the springtime?

A man goes to the doctor to get some test results. As he sits in the doctors office he sees that there are three folders on the doctor’s desk. One is labeled Good News. Another is labeled Bad News. And yet another is labeled Bad News and Good News.

The holiday of Sukkot is not only lots of fun, but it is also deeply meaningful and spiritually enriching. It is a perfect time to get kids involved in keeping the commandments and to teach them important things about the Kingdom of God. On the holiday of Sukkot, the Bible gives us tangible and visual ways to worship God and learn about Him.

If you compare a modern-day Jewish calendar with passages in the Torah that refer to the holidays (such as Leviticus 23), you will find a notable discrepancy. Many holidays that the Bible seems to say last for one day are observed for two days on the Jewish calendar. Learn why this practice exists and if it is truly biblical.

Seven days you shall eat unleavened bread. On the first day you shall remove leaven out of your houses, for if anyone eats what is leavened, from the first day until the seventh day, that person shall be cut off from Israel. (Exodus 12:15)

Was Jesus’ Last Supper a Passover Seder? On what day did Yeshua die, and did he celebrate a Passover Seder with his disciples or not?

Yeshua died on a Friday, but what day of the month was it? And by “day of the month,” I mean, on what day of the biblical calendar did He die? Was it the thirteenth day of Nissan, the fourteenth day of Nissan, or the fifteenth day of Nissan?

The primary function of the Passover Seder is to tell the story of the exodus to one’s children. The booklet that we read during the seder is called the Haggadah, which means “telling.” As it says, “You shall tell your son on that day, ‘It is because of what the LORD did for me when I came out of Egypt’” (Exodus 13:8).

So you’ve decided to do a Passover seder meal! Good. The celebration of the Passover with unleavened bread and bitter herbs is a commandment. Even more, it is a commandment of the Master to do this in remembrance of Him! You are preparing to keep one of the Master’s most sacred instructions to his disciples! God will bless you as you keep his Torah and His son’s command. May the Lord bless your home.

Is it permissible for a Gentile to eat a Passover Seder meal? The Torah does warn, "A sojourner or a hired servant shall not eat of it" (Exodus 12:45), and it also says, "No uncircumcised person may eat of it" (Exodus 12:48).

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